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Representating 400,000 individuals
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Welcome to Adobe GoLive 5

Welcome to Broadband 4Britain - the UK's Broadband pressure group and information centre - keeping you up to date with developements on the British Broadband situation.

So what is Broadband? Why do we want it? How does it work? Why can't I get it?
Welcome to Adobe GoLive 5

Links to other Broadband websites and resources...

In this 21st century global economy, the sad fact is that British businesses are suffering in the Broadband famine - and many don't even realise it...

Internet Gaming, Video-Conferencing and virtual shopping - and a whole world of other exciting services yet to even be imagined...

 



In general, Broadband refers to telecommunication in which a wide band of frequencies is available to transmit information.  Subsequently, information can be sent concurrently on many different frequencies or channels within the band, allowing more information to be transmitted in a given amountof time (much as more lanes on a motorway allow more cars to travel on it at the same time).  Broadband is distinct from Narrowband - a term used to define traditional modes of transmission such as an analogue telephone line.
 
Definers of Broadband have assigned a minimum data rate to the term, and these vary between 256Kbps and 1MB.  
 
It is generally agreed that Digital Subscriber Line (DSL), Wireless Local Loop (WLL) and T1/E1 are modes of Broadband "access network" - the physical infrastructure that connect homes and businessesto the service provider network, and the Internet. 
 
The provision of Broadband services to a local population depends on the availability of incumbent infrastructure reaching out to houses, hospitals, schools and offices.  In the same way that the UK's road network is not the responsibility of trucking firms, manufacturing companies and shoppers - the UK's broadband network similarly falls under the government's remit on behalf of every type of businesses, public sector organisation, society and individual in the land. 
 
If you thought Railtrack's difficulties with the rail network was bad - the UK's Broadband infrastructure can't even claim to be the worst of its kind in Europe!  Many poor, developing countries in far-flung corners of the world are making faster headway than the UK in Broadband provisioning - and into the global e-marketplace.  In the world of telecommunications - the UK is a laughing stock.
 
Commentators agree that the government needs to give stronger powers to its regulator Oftel, in order to push BT further in the direction of open competition.  In addition, Downing Street has to develop a clear policy on where the UK is headed on the world's Broadband map.  Subsided services, a countrywide infrastructure investment, and a programme of education among UK's citizens on the possibilities of Broadband are some of the ways in which the government can kick-start an improvement.
 
As it stands, the government has two major, well-publicised Internet related objectives - to get the government online, and to get British businesses on line.  It doesn't take a rocket-scientist to see the irony.




Please take a moment to sign the online petition, the results of which along with the questionnaire will be presented to parliament. We also urge you to contact your MP, and have your say on the B4B message board.

Sign Our Online Petition!

Read and comment on our manifesto.


Become a Local Hero! Broadband4Britain is actively recruiting Broadband "Local Heroes" to evangelise the benefits of broadband Internet access within their communities, with the objective of igniting non-urban broadband demand.


B4B welcomes your contributions, suggestions and comments - email us or complete the enquiry form.
 


Help promote the campaign by telling a friend or two!


Resources for locating and contacting your local MP.


Have your say and share your experiences in the B4B discussion forum.


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